mental illness

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness
January 26, 2015
Categories: Topics

Concurrent Disorders (also described as dual diagnosis orco-morbitity) describes a condition in which a person has both a mental illness and a substance use problem. This term is a general one that refers to a wide range of mental illnesses and addictions. For example, someone with schizophrenia who is addicted to crack has a concurrent disorder, as does an individual who suffers from chronic depression and...

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness
January 19, 2015
Categories: Topics

People with poor mental health are more susceptible to the three main factors that can lead to homelessness: poverty, disaffiliation, and personal vulnerability. Because they often lack the capacity to sustain employment, they have little income. Delusional thinking may lead them to withdraw from friends, family and other people. This loss of support leaves them fewer coping resources in times of trouble. Mental illness can also impair a person’s ability to be resilient and resourceful; it...

York University
February 10, 2014

Those who work in the homelessness sector are well aware that individuals are often discharged from hospitals and mental health facilities into homelessness. There are two main consequences to this. First, the mental health and well-being of such individuals is likely to worsen if discharged into homelessness rather than housing, and second, staff in emergency shelters and day programs are not well-equipped to provide necessary and appropriate supports for people in such situations.

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