Research Summaries

Research Summaries

Publication Date: 2013
Those who are homeless in Toronto have significantly higher than average death rates. They are 29 times more likely to have hepatitis C. They are also more likely to have heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Those experiencing homelessness have less access to healthcare. Over 50% reported not having a family doctor. The realities of increased illness, lack of treatment and lack of access also affects their ability to access end of life...
Publication Date: 2013
Those who are homeless have a higher chance of getting hepatitis B virus (HBV). Throughout the United States there is an average of 2.9 out of 100,000 cases of HBV. A study made up of those who are homeless and have a mental illness or use substances found 32.5% tested positive for HBV. Hepatitis B can be prevented through a course of 3 doses of a vaccine. These must be administered at intervals within a 6 month period. The period and...
Publication Date: 2013
Deaths among homeless people occur at higher than average rates. This is partly due to higher rates of AIDS, cancer and hepatitis and also due to lack of access to regular healthcare services. Homeless people in Canada are entitled to public healthcare services; however, they can often be hard to access. There are barriers that prevent treatment, follow up and compliance with treatment. Causes of death among an urban homeless...
Publication Date: 2013
Youth and adults who are experiencing homelessness connected quality of life to feelings of respect and acceptance. Those experiencing homelessness frequently do not feel like they have full citizenship within society. This is partly due to media and advertising portrayals that reproduce negative stereotypes of homelessness. Download the summary (PDF)Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-...
Publication Date: 2013
Young women who are experiencing homelessness are eager to re-engage with school. This is most likely to occur when there are a range of supports available to them by agencies and when school staff provides long-term support. Efforts to increase access to education for girls who have lived on the street must take into account the need for learning approaches that validate their life experience. Social exclusion, gender and access to...
Publication Date: 2013
Street-involved and homeless youth experience more health problems than non-homeless youth, and particularly high rates of addiction and mental health problems. Despite this, use of available substance use and mental health services tends to be low among street-involved youth. This lack of service access may worsen already poor health and contribute to chronic homelessness. There is currently little understanding on the implications of...

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