Research Summaries

Research Summaries

Publication Date: 2013
Research on street youth in Canada suggests these young people are heavily ‘at-risk’ of becoming involved in criminal activities. Street youth, however, become involved in criminal activities to different degrees, ranging from not at all to high rates of participation. The types of offenses they engage in also vary, and can include property crimes, distribution of drugs, and violent crimes such as robbery and physical altercations....
Publication Date: 2013
Canadian literature has not fully uncovered the relationship between youth homelessness and mental health, and how they are related to both risks and resources present in pre-street and homeless circumstances. It is clear that homeless youth experience high rates of poor mental health, and that many youth are immersed in an environment characterized by substantial risk. Evidence suggests that many youth are subjected to tremendous...
Publication Date: 2013
Housing First is a treatment, service and social policy approach based on the idea that a homeless individual’s primary need is to attain secure and stable housing before other issues in the individual’s life can be dealt with. Its fundamental principle is that housing is a basic right, and should be made available regardless of whether individuals, particularly those with mental health concerns and/or addictions, desire treatment....
Publication Date: 2013
In Ontario, youth between the ages of 16-18 can apply to the Courts to terminate a Society or Crown wardship order. Young people involved with the Children’s Aid Society (CAS) in Ontario commonly talk about “signing out of care” when they turn 16. This expression makes it hard to see the complicated institutional work that is involved in ending a wardship order with child protection services, not to mention the challenges youth face...
Publication Date: 2013
Homeless youth in rural settings face unique circumstances including fewer housing options and services to meet their needs. They are frequently forced to leave their communities and social networks in order to receive services or find shelter. Moreover, research suggests that homelessness is often one of several traumatic experiences these young people will face in their lives. While understanding the causes of youth homelessness (...
Publication Date: 2013
Adolescent development is generally viewed as a gradual process that is guided by supportive adults, particularly family members. This focus shifts however, when we think about homeless youth and family becomes viewed as the ‘problem’, and youth are pushed to become ‘self-sufficient’. However, this oversimplifies the nature and composition of families and relationships. More importantly, it overlooks families as potential partners in...

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