Research Summaries

Research Summaries

Publication Date: 2013
Studies have shown that at least half of the homeless population suffers from mental health issues, almost half of homeless people have substance use issues, and inmates who have a mental health problem are twice as likely as those without to have been homeless in the year before incarceration. Taken together, these factors make it extremely difficult for homeless persons with multiple needs to maintain housing. Housing services for...
Publication Date: 2013
Changes in political, social, and economic practices over the past few decades (referred to in this chapter as neoliberalism) have shaped the way government and society at large view and address youth homelessness. These practices include reduced social support, increased individual accountability, particularly in regards to maintaining employment and managing personal finances, and greater reliance on the private sector to provide...
Publication Date: 2013
Research on street youth in Canada suggests these young people are heavily ‘at-risk’ of becoming involved in criminal activities. Street youth, however, become involved in criminal activities to different degrees, ranging from not at all to high rates of participation. The types of offenses they engage in also vary, and can include property crimes, distribution of drugs, and violent crimes such as robbery and physical altercations....
Publication Date: 2013
Canadian literature has not fully uncovered the relationship between youth homelessness and mental health, and how they are related to both risks and resources present in pre-street and homeless circumstances. It is clear that homeless youth experience high rates of poor mental health, and that many youth are immersed in an environment characterized by substantial risk. Evidence suggests that many youth are subjected to tremendous...
Publication Date: 2013
Housing First is a treatment, service and social policy approach based on the idea that a homeless individual’s primary need is to attain secure and stable housing before other issues in the individual’s life can be dealt with. Its fundamental principle is that housing is a basic right, and should be made available regardless of whether individuals, particularly those with mental health concerns and/or addictions, desire treatment....
Publication Date: 2013
In Ontario, youth between the ages of 16-18 can apply to the Courts to terminate a Society or Crown wardship order. Young people involved with the Children’s Aid Society (CAS) in Ontario commonly talk about “signing out of care” when they turn 16. This expression makes it hard to see the complicated institutional work that is involved in ending a wardship order with child protection services, not to mention the challenges youth face...

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