Research Summaries

Research Summaries

Publication Date: 2013
Housing that meets a broad range of needs is a vital part of any community’s social well-being. Housing is also an important contributor to economic performance with each constructed house generating approximately two person years of employment (equivalent of one year's worth of work for two people or two years of work for one person). For many Canadians, homeownership is not an option, and a growing number will need access to rental...
Publication Date: 2012
Many middle and upper class households moved to the suburbs after World War II, leaving the downtown core to be occupied by lower income households, including homeless people. The suburbs provided both an escape from the “problems of the city” for those who could afford a car and a home, and a place for them to exercise their individual freedom in the form of private property. However, with gas prices and traffic congestion on the rise...
Publication Date: 2012
Shelter service is a local response to the increasing number of homeless people in North America and Europe. The success of a shelter is commonly measured by looking at the shelter’s ability to limit the amount of homelessness, meet the immediate and long-term needs of clients, and help shelter users secure stable housing after leaving the shelter. Service delivery tends to be different from one shelter to the next and also varies...
Publication Date: 2012
This research examines the nature of animal caretaking among female, homeless shelter residents in Canada. It evaluates the literature on homeless women, investigates the benefits and drawbacks of companion animals, and studies the relationship between homeless populations and companion animals.   Download the summary (PDF) Homeless Women's Voices on Incorporating Companion Animals into Shelter Services was published in the...
Publication Date: 2012
In addition to the lifelong elderly homeless population, there are now elderly people who are becoming homeless for the first time in their lives. Recently homeless older adults have different needs than those that have been homeless for a long time. However, current homelessness services tend to treat them as if they had been homeless a long time. Recently homeless older adults lack experience finding support for their recent needs...
Publication Date: 2012
A national housing policy does not exist in Canada, which makes an individual’s housing his/her sole responsibility. Social housing programs are needed to meet the needs of vulnerable older adults as many of them face challenges that make it difficult to hold onto their home. Some of these challenges include living on a small income, being socially isolated and suffering from ongoing illness that affect their physical and mental...

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