Research On Counts

Research On Counts

This fact sheet addresses the following myths: Myth 1: Point-in-Time counts do not count every homeless person and therefore are inaccurate. Myth 2: Other national statistics contradict the data presented in Point-in-Time counts. Myth 3: Point-in-Time counts are meant to provide data on everyone who is homeless during a year. Myth 4: Fluctuations in the...
The Panel Study on Homelessness, being conducted in Ottawa, is a first attempt at examining the pathways into and out of homelessness by following a cohort of homeless persons over time. The research objective for the first wave of the study was to interview a representative sample of current residents of Ottawa emergency shelters in order to gather...
Risks of life on the street caused by inclement weather, harassment, and assault threaten the unsheltered homeless population. We address some challenges of enumerating the street homeless population by testing a novel capture-recapture (CR) estimation approach that models individuals' intermittent daytime visibility. We tested walking and vehicle-based...
Measuring Homelessness: A Review of Recent Research is an excellent source of information for academics, students, and housing professionals. It provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the literature that focuses on the methods used to count homeless people. It discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and indicates the...
Any estimate of the number of homeless persons involves several definitional issues, including the underlying conceptual definition of homelessness; the intended use of, and rationale for, the count; how the conceptual definition is translated into operational procedures; and methodological choices. These issues are at least partially responsible for the...
This article assesses the potential of mark-recapture methods as a relatively powerful innovative research method for estimating the prevalence of hard-to-reach human populations in the social welfare field. The development of mark-recapture methods, illustrating some recent applications and reviewing the main methodological and practical questions raised...
How many homeless people live in Toronto: Are there 500? 5,000? Or perhaps even 50,000? On April 15, 2009, hundreds of homeless outreach workers and volunteers are set to visit about half of Toronto neighbourhoods for Toronto‟s second count of homeless people and street needs assessment. The results are expected in late June or early July. Counting the...
The enumeration of homeless individuals is a topic of great importance to programs and professionals serving them, as funding for essential services to this population is often contingent upon quantitative evidence that a significant problem exists. However, this task is often difficult due to methodological quandaries such as the lack of a standard...
This paper considers the possibility of accurately measuring the numbers of persons homeless in a given location, at particular times. It is maintained that such data are necessary to the efficient apportioning of resources, but hitherto have been unobtainable through "traditional"methods of counting. In recent years researchers have advocated the use of...
Enumerating or estimating the numbers of homeless people has become an important research activity in the past few decades. The methodologies of almost all efforts to count homeless people have been closely linked to advocacy activities such as providing shelter and food to those in need. Yet the effect of advocacy work on estimating or enumerating homeless...

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