Social media, academics and the epistomology of knowledge

Social media, academics and the epistomology of knowledge

A while ago I read this interesting presentation on Web 2.0 in academic contexts (teaching, research, libraries) by Lambert Heller when it occurred to me that I have recently adopted a new Web 2.0 tool myself that I am finding increasingly useful: Twitter.

Now I’m perfectly aware that my discovery of Twitter for getting valuable updates from colleagues and keeping in touch (not literally a discovery, of course – I don’t live under a rock -, but in the sense of “I actually want to use that”) comes many years late. But while I was working on my dissertation and other projects, I found that I had a very limited capacity for new technology and not a lot of patience to adjust my medial habits. A microblog is not rocket science from a usage perspective, but when you’re already up to your throat in emails and the schedule is tight, experimentation is generally not too high up on the agenda. That, and I believe that academics in particular are prone to having their share of scruples when it comes to things like Twitter.

Let me use myself as my own test subject for a moment. The time it takes to adapt to a new tool (time that many people in research feel they sorely lack) is one factor. But what is it specifically about (many) academics that causes them to be reluctant about writing a research blog or using a social network for purposes related to work?

ORGANIZATION: CorpBlawg
PUBLICATION DATE: 2010